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Foreign nuclear waste has no place in America

Tooele Transcript-Bulletin

The hazardous waste industry, and nuclear waste in particular, have never been simple issues within Tooele County. While some along the Wasatch Front would like to see this genie put back into the bottle, most local residents have long realized our hazardous waste corridor is here to stay — requiring us to take a more pragmatic and nuanced view of the industry.

Depleted uranium: Don't disregard the scientists

Salt Lake Tribune

DU: Depleted uranium, a unique waste that will become more and more radioactive until, roughly, the year 1002009. The acronym also gives sound guidance for where depleted uranium should be buried: deep underground.

But a lack of deep, underground storage space and a growing need to find permanent storage for 1.4 million tons of DU is "clearly driving" federal regulators to erroneously steer the materials to shallow burial sites like EnergySolutions' low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Utah.

Radiation board requires safety report on depleted uranium

Salt Lake Tribune

EnergySolutions won't be able to bring more depleted uranium to Utah until the company proves the waste can be safely disposed in Tooele County for the long run.

That's what the Utah Radiation Control Board decided Tuesday by sticking to principles it adopted last month, even after the company threatened legal action.

Utah Radiation Control Board makes decision about EnergySolutions

ABC4

TOOELE COUNTY, Utah (ABC 4 News) - EnergySolutions will have to prove it can dispose of depleted uranium safely before it can bring any more harmful waste into Tooele County.

That's the decision the Utah Radiation Board made Tuesday night.

According to the Salt Lake Tribune, the limit on depleted uranium won't go into effect for several months.

But before that time the company can still bring up to 15,000 drums from South Carolina before the limit goes into effect.